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GRILL A RABBIT FOR INDEPENDENCE

GRILLED RABBITI have noticed over the last few years that more and more people are eating rabbit. It is not hard for me to see why, Rabbit is a incredibly tender and delicate white meat that weighs in with less fat, cholesterol, and calories per ounce, but has more calcium and protein than chicken, turkey, beef, pork, lamb and even certain fish. Chefs and hobby cooks are using the culinary appeal of rabbit to reintroduce the rabbit to the American palate. Domestic rabbit has long been held in high regard for its nutritional value, today’s domesticated rabbit is considered far superior to any wild rabbit (they’re milder and plumper than their wild counterparts). Now its fine-grained, tender white meat is highly favored for its versatility, feed efficiency, sustainability and productivity.

I like young rabbit best when it is cooked slowly over the barbecue, while basted with a spicy marinade or blackberry jam or even pineapple juice there is so much more you can do! On the grill rabbit is best to slow cooking,(LOW and SLOW) anything in between can leave it tasting tough. Treat rabbit as you would when grilling a whole chicken of the same weight. It’s very lean and dries out easily so watch it carefully as it cooks. I like marinating it for at least three hours (preferably overnight in a marinade or even a brine) prior to setting it on the grill and then basting it occasionally during cooking. I have slow roasted on the grill covered in a thin layer of pancetta or bacon or you even truss a big piece of pork fat over it and the results have always been delicious. The extra fat surely contributed to the success of that dish. At the very least, consider wrapping the loin/middle cavity with bacon.

Since rabbit is lean and can dry out, brining would definitely make the rabbit more resistant to overcooking. Since rabbit has very little fat in the meat, it should be cooked over low heat or it will be tough. Many recipes call for boiling the meat prior to placing them on the grill. Brush with the marinade or chosen sauce and grill for 20 – 35 minutes, less if boiled prior, turning frequently until golden brown and tender or until the juices of the meat run clear when skewered. Pound for Pound rabbit is not only the best tasting meat around it is also the healthiest! Rabbit meat is lower in fat than even boneless and skinless chicken breast! You can use rabbit meat in any recipe that calls for chicken or any other meat recipe for a low fat alternative

Brines are salty solutions that help lean meats(like rabbit) hold their moisture so they stay juicy and tender during grilling. Sugar, spices, and herbs are sometimes added to the liquid as well. Soak rabbit in a container large enough to submerge the meat completely without allowing it to float in the solution. Store in the refrigerator. Before grilling, rinse brined meat to remove excess salt and dry it with paper towels. Brine works like a marinade, but seems to penetrate deeper into the meat. By preparing the brine the night before, the flavours of the spices have all night to stick to the salt, and the salt will carry these flavours deep into the meat

Rise And Shine Rabbitry’s Spicy Brine- The name says it all!
This is enough for a small to large fryer. I like to make the brine up a day or two before to let the brine mixture sit to get all the taste in the brine and then soak the rabbit for a day or overnight to infuse the taste in to the rabbit
INGREDIENTS-
4 cups hot water
1/2 cup sea salt
2 cinnamon sticks
1 Tablespoon black peppercorn crushed
1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
1 tablespoon ginger, ground
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 Teaspoons cloves
2 bay leaves dried
4 cups ice cold water

In a stainless steel saucepan, bring 4 cups of water to the boil, add the Sea salt and stir until dissolved, add all the ingredients other than the ice-cold water, Put the lid on the pan, and let cool down slowly, preferably overnight, so as to allow the flavour of the spices to fully penetrate the brine (watch the colour of the brine changing from light tan to dark brown), After cooled down completely, pour the brine into a large non-reactive pan or bowl, and add 4 cups of (ice)cold water; This spicy brine is now ready for use!

Blacked Beer-Brined Grilled Rabbit- This is awsome! even better with a good beer or my favorite glass of hard cider!
2 cups apple cider
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup kosher salt
1 cinnamon stick
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1 cut up fryer rabbit
2 12-ounce bottles dark or amber beer
2 tablespoons butter
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon cayenne (optional)

Combine the cider, sugar, salt, cinnamon, bay leaf, peppercorns, and cloves in a sauce pan over medium heat. Stir just until sugar and salt are dissolved. Remove from heat and let to cool to room temperature.
Lay the rabbit pieces, in a shallow glass or ceramic (not metal) baking dish. Stir the beer into the cider mixture, then pour over the rabbit. Cover and refrigerate the rabbit for 4 to 8 hours or even overnight. When ready to grill, heat a gas or charcoal grill to to high heat (about 450-degrees). Meanwhile, transfer the rabbit from the brine to a clean plate and let it rest, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes to take the chill off. Melt butter and stir in chili powder and cayenne. Brush half the chili butter over each of rabbit piece and lay on the grill. Cover and let cook undisturbed for 15 minutes. Flip the pirces, and brush with the remaining chili butter(you may have to make more to baste).
Cover and cook for another 10 minutes. Check the rabbit doneness, and if necessary, continue cooking in 5 minute increments until it has finished cooking. The rabbit is done when the interior reaches 165°F, its juices run clear.
Remember any poultry brine can be used with great success on rabbit! Experiment make up your own let me know how it was put it on the comment section!

Dry Rub for rabbit
A dry rub not only adds great flavor, but the dry rub also creates the perfect coating. it’s also important to know how to apply the dry rub Sprinkle dry rub on the meat. Apply an even coating; use a shaker to coat the rabbit without getting too much dry rub in one spot. Make sure to apply a coating of dry rub over the entire piece of meat. Press the dry rub into the meat. Pressing the dry rub onto the meat ensures that most of the dry rub clings to the meat. Some pit masters even massage the dry rub into the meat so that it further penetrates the meat as it cooks. Wrap the meat in plastic wrap. The plastic wrap serves two purposes. First, the plastic wrap ensures that the dry rub doesn’t fall off during the marinating process. Second, the plastic wrap helps keep your refrigerator sanitary. Lay a piece of plastic wrap on the counter top and place the meat in the center. Bring the two longest sides of the plastic wrap together and roll tightly. Carefully roll the ends of the plastic wrap so that the meat is tightly wrapped. Allow to marinate for 1 to 2 hours. Dry rubs work quicker than a wet marinade. In only an hour or so, your meat will be ready to hit the grill or smoker.

RISE AND SHINE’S RABBIT RUB-
1/2 cup paprika
3 tablespoons cayenne pepper
5 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
6 tablespoons garlic powder
3 tablespoons onion powder
6 tablespoons salt
2 1/2 tablespoons dried oregano
2 1/2 tablespoons dried thyme
In a medium bowl, combine the paprika, cayenne pepper, ground black pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, oregano, and thyme. Mix well, and store in a cool, dry place in an airtight container.

BBQ Rub For Rabbit
Ingredients:
1/4 C. paprika
1 tbsp. brown sugar
1 tbsp. white sugar
1 tbsp. kosher salt
1 1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 tsp. cayenne
1 tsp. dry mustard
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. onion powder
Instructions: Combine in a bowl or shake together in a jar. Apply liberally to rabbit pieces or whole rabbit

A marinade makes meat better by adding moisture, increasing tenderness and adding flavor. Have a problem with rabbit drying out on the grill? Try a good poultry marinade to not only help prevent meats from drying out, but to also protect the more delicate rabbit while also adding flavor. When marinating poultry makes sure to separate pieces to allow the marinade to reach as much of the meat as possible. marinate for at least 3 hours or better overnight

GRILLED BASIL MARINATED RABBIT
Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon chopped basil leaves, plus 4 sprigs for garnish
1 tablespoon finely chopped red onion
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 rabbit cut into pieces (about 2+ pounds)

Directions-
Whisk together the oil, vinegar, basil, onion, salt, peppercorns, and garlic in a bowl. Transfer the marinade to a gallon-sized sealable plastic bag with the rabbit and shake to combine. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours and up to 12 hours.
When ready to cook, build a charcoal fire or preheat gas grill.
Remove rabbit from the marinade. Grill the rabbit, turning once, until browned and cooked through

Honey Lime Grilled Rabbit Marinade
Ingredients-
1 rabbit cut into pieces
1/2 cup lime juice
1/3 cup vegetable oil
3 Tbsp honey
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp dried rosemary
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 tsp black pepper
Directions:
Combine lime juice, oil, honey, thyme, rosemary, garlic and pepper. Pour it over rabbit pieces in a Ziploc bag. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours up to overnight. Grill until done and juices run clear.

Pineapple Marinade-
Ingredients-
1 cup crushed pineapple
1/3 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup honey
1/4 cup cider vinegar
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon ginger powder
1/4 teaspoon powdered cloves
Mix all ingredients together and use immediately or store in airtight container for up to 7 days.

So grill a rabbit for Independence this holiday. Start raising your own food and medicine in a garden, Raise a sustainable meat supply like rabbits, get some of your own independence!

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COOKING RABBIT- HINTS AND TRICKS

Unless you’re a vegetarian, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t consider eating rabbit instead of ham, turkey, chicken or beef for dinner. This country still has the Easter Bunny syndrome! Europeans, especially the French, Italians, Portuguese, Spanish, Hungarians and Germans eat lots of rabbit.

If we can get over our prejudices, eating rabbit makes a lot of sense. Four ounces of roasted rabbit meat has 175 calories and 7.2 grams of fat, slightly less in both categories than skinless turkey dark meat. And rabbit meat has more flavor than chicken, to which it is often compared.

Rabbit is an all white meat that’s lower in cholesterol than chicken or turkey (164 mg of cholesterol in rabbit vs. 220 mg in chicken), has just 795 calories per pound (chicken has 810 calories per pound), and has the highest percentage of protein and the lowest percentage of fat of any meat. In short, meat doesn’t get any healthier. If you want more information I have a post in the October archives on the HEALTH BENEFITS OF RABBIT MEAT check it out. Now on to cooking rabbit!

Jointing a Rabbit-

Working with rabbit is very much like working with chicken. Think of the forelegs as wings. There isn’t much breast meat but the saddle or tenderloin makes up for it. When cutting up a rabbit, remove hind legs and forelegs and the saddle (or have the butcher do it). The bony rib cage can be used for stock. A 2-1/2 pound rabbit should serve 2 people, more if you have a rich sauce or several side dishes.

Although a rabbit can be roasted whole (stuffed or unstuffed), it is most often cut into pieces and cooked slowly in a casserole or stew. Domestic rabbit, although available as saddle or legs, may still need to be cut into smaller pieces before cooking.

1. Lay the rabbit, on its back, on a chopping board and cut the legs away from the main carcass with a large chef’s knife. (To cut right through the bone, it may be necessary to tap the back of the knife with a kitchen weight or mallet, protecting the back of the knife with a cloth.)

2. Cut down the center of the legs to separate them. Then divide each leg in two, cutting through the knee joint. Cut the body into three or four pieces, making the last cut just below the ribcage

3. Cutting lengthwise through the center of the breastbone, divide the ribcage section in half. If you wish to remove small bones from the flesh around the breastbone, use pliers or pull them with your fingers.

Rabbit Cooking Hints and Tricks-

For safety, cook rabbit until it reaches 160 degrees F.

A rabbit weighing between 2.5 lbs and 3.5 lbs makes six portions: two saddles, two thighs and two front legs.

Either cooked or raw, rabbit meat freezes very well.

Rabbit meat can be grilled, roasted, braised, fried or barbecued. It also makes great terrines and pates, and the liver and kidneys are delicious.

It takes 60 to 90 minutes to cook rabbit meat at 325F (160C).

Rabbit can easily be used in recipes calling for chicken, turkey and veal.

As rabbit is a lean meat, it is important to baste it often when roasting to avoid it drying out.

Excellent rabbit seasonings include parsley, rosemary, sage, bay leaf, lemon-grass, coriander, and basil.

Rabbit may be soaked in a marinade of sugar or honey, red wine, or olive oil seasoned with herbs.

Fryer rabbit can replace chicken in almost any recipe, but if you’ve never cooked rabbit before, it’s a great idea to start with a trusted recipe.

When barbecuing rabbit, marinate the meat first or baste it with a mix of lemon juice and olive oil with herbs. Grill it first on high heat, than continue to cook it on medium heat for a further 40 to 45 minutes with the lid closed.

Fresh herbs marry very well with rabbit meat. Try basil, lemon grass, coriander, bay leaf, parsley, rosemary, thyme, marjoram, and sage. It also works well with wine-based sauces and fruit sauces made with raspberry, pear and apple.

Use rabbit legs as a substitute for chicken in paella or other dishes.

Though white wine is often used to deglaze the pan that rabbit is sauteed in, you can also use grappa (the fiery Italian clear brandy) and balsamic vinegar.

Rabbit liver is unusually large and unusually delicious. Sear it on both sides in clarified butter, leaving it pink inside. Then add a few shallots to the pan with some wine, port or brandy and cook a few minutes. Process with a touch of cream, salt, pepper and a pinch of allspice or nutmeg for quick pate.

When roasting whole, buttered or lard with pork back fat, or wrap in foil to keep the flesh moist and tender. Or bone the main body and fill with a stuffing. Baste the rabbit frequently during cooking.

Marinate in wine or olive oil, with aromatic vegetables and seasonings, before cooking to help tenderize the meat.

Poach or braise young rabbits; stew or casserole older ones.

Use a rabbit to make a terrine. Grind the rabbit meat with 2 shallots and mix in 2 eggs, two-thirds cup heavy cream, 2 tbsp. shelled pistachios, 1 tbsp. dried cranberries, 2 tbsp. chopped fresh parsley, and seasonings. Place in a pot lined with bacon slices and bake in a water bath at 350 degrees F for 2 hours. Add 1 and one-quarter cups liquid aspic after cooking. Allow to cool and refrigerate until set.

Roasting rabbit-
To roast a rabbit, rub it down with olive oil and chopped herbs and place it in a roasting pan. It may then be baked just like a chicken, at about 350 degrees F. (A 2 pound rabbit takes about 1 – 1 1/2 hours to cook at this temperature.)

Braising rabbit-
Begin by browning the rabbit in a little olive oil. Then place the meat in a pot and cover it about a quarter of the way with water. Cover the pot and allow the meat to simmer for about an hour.

Stewing rabbit-
Chop the rabbit meat into small pieces (about one inch square). If desired, roll in flour or seasonings. In a preheated pan with a little olive oil added, brown the meat on every side. Place the meat in a large pot and cover with boiling water. Cover the pan with a well-fitted lid and simmer for at least two hours, or until meat is tender. Add vegetables to the last hour of cooking.

Sauteing rabbit-
Thin cuts of rabbit (no more than one inch thick) are suitable for sauteing. First, preheat a pan and add a small amount of olive oil. Place the rabbit in the pan and brown both sides, cooking until it reaches 160 degrees F.

Shreaded rabbit–You can use either stove or crockpot to cook the rabbit ahead of time. But don’t boil it… simmer it very gently so it barely bubbles. Simmer for 1 to 1 1/2 hours or until meat falls of bones, Remove and allow to cool. When cool,pull meat from the bones and shred. You can freeze the meat for later use or make all kind off foods with this! I have made Rabbit Tacos,Rabbit Salad Sandwiches,so much more. I like to use apple juice for part of the liquid. I use a bay leaf or two, some herbs and some black pepper and allspice for seasonings.

Here’s a very simple but tasty grilled rabbit recipe for the outdoor barbecue. Preparation time, 15 minutes, Cooking time, 80 minutes. Serves 4 to 6.

1 fryer rabbit, cut up
1-1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/2 cup cooking oil
1/2 cup sherry
1-1/2 tsp seasoned salt
Rub rabbit with salt and pepper; place over medium hot bed of live coals. You can use a gas grill. Make sauce by mixing oil, wine and seasoned salt together. Keep rabbit well basted with sauce, turn often while cooking 1 hour or until rabbit pieces are tender.

For More Recipes Check Out The DOMESTIC RABBIT RECIPE PAGE